Writings by Techne: WLU Biopolitical Research Group Members

Containing Community
From Political Economy to Ontology in Agamben, Esposito, and Nancy

Community has been both celebrated and demonized as a fortress that shelters and defends its members from being exposed to difference. Instead of abandoning community as an antiquated model of relationships that is ill suited for our globalized world, this book turns to the writings of Giorgio Agamben, Roberto Esposito, and Jean-Luc Nancy in search for ways to rethink community in an open and inclusive manner. Greg Bird argues that a central piece of this task is found in how each philosopher rearticulates community not as something that is proper to those who belong and improper to those who are excluded or where inclusion is based on one’s share in common property. We must return to the forgotten dimension of sharing, not as a sharing of things that we can contain and own, but as a process that divides us up and shares us out in community with one another. This book traces this problem through a wide array of fields ranging from biopolitics, communitarianism, existentialism, phenomenology, political economy, radical philosophy, and social theory. 

http://www.sunypress.edu/p-6266-containing-community.aspx

 

COMMUNITY, IMMUNITY, AND THE PROPER: Roberto Esposito

It is widely apparent in our hyper-globalized world that the epistemologies, institutions, and practices underwriting it have reached a state of profound crisis. In the globalized world, everything is inevitably brought into proximity and correlation. Wars, natural disasters, climatic upheaval, nor political and economic turmoil, none of these can be effectively isolated, insulated, instituted, even immunized, as something apart, something that might be considered proper only to itself. This collected edition considers this crisis of the proper with a focus on Italian political theorist Roberto Esposito’s work on community, immunity, and biopolitics.

https://www.routledge.com/Community-Immunity-and-the-Proper-Roberto-Esposito/Bird-Short/p/book/9781138057388

 
 

The Subject of Liberation: Žižek, Politics, Psychoanalysis

The book shares Žižek's central problem of how to revitalize the radical political left through theory. It initially follows the argument developed in The Ticklish Subject that contemporary leftist thought is divided by antagonism between a Marxist revolutionary politics founded on Enlightenment philosophy and a politics of identity founded on post-modern post-structuralism. How Žižek used Lacan's theory of character structures is examined here to describe this theoretical deadlock and explain how the dominant contemporary ideologies of liberal tolerant multiculturalism and reactionary "pseudo-fundamentalism" compete to mobilize the individual subject's unconscious drive to enjoyment. The book thus emphasizes the moments in which Žižek hints that Lacanian theory may describe a practice that facilitates the resolution of antagonisms that placate radical leftist politics. It challenges prevalent interpretations of Lacanian ends of analysis, to ultimately connect the psychoanalytic cure to the leftist project of social and political liberation. The Subject of Liberation argues that if Lacan is to be useful to leftist politics, then the left has to develop its own definitions of the post-analytic subject, and proposes one such definition developed out of Lacanian and Žižekian theory. 
http://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/the-subject-of-liberation-9781623564988/
 

Enjoyment and Submission in Modern Fantasy (Palgrave MacMillan, 2016)

  

This book analyses the modern subject’s passion for submission in several contemporary contexts. (Re)introducing ‘bourgeois’ as an analytical term that describes a psychic economy rather than a social class allows Panu to display the intimate connections between the violences of the liberal-capitalist regime and the enjoyment of the bourgeois subject. The chapters investigate from diverse perspectives the continuity between this subject’s looping circuits of trauma and anxiety; his/her difficult relationship with symbolic authority; and the neoliberal governing apparatuses. So far, most anticapitalist and decolonial struggles in the West have been hesitant when engaging with the issue of bourgeois enjoyment as the main source of capitalism’s resilience. This exciting new work draws on an extensive range of theorists to emphasize how the reiteration of capitalist reality relies on mechanisms irreducible to rationality or knowledge, such as desire, enjoyment, and the obscure nature of selfhood.

http://link.springer.com/book/10.1057%2F978-1-137-51321-2